Tony Fadell – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

January 24, 2015

podfather candidate

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Fadell


Jon Rubinstein – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

January 24, 2015

podfather candidate

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Rubinstein


The Pop History Dig – a collection of short stories about popular culture – its history, its people, and its power

January 24, 2015

James Vincent

http://www.pophistorydig.com/topics/ipod-silhouettes-2000-2011/


Distributed Information Processing in Biological and Computational Systems | January 2015 | Communications of the ACM

January 24, 2015

http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2015/1/181614-distributed-information-processing-in-biological-and-computational-systems/fulltext


In Search of Bayesian Inference | January 2015 | Communications of the ACM

January 24, 2015

http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2015/1/181628-in-search-of-bayesian-inference/fulltext


24 January, 2015 20:05

January 24, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/25/nyregion/sheldon-silvers-link-to-a-bonanza-and-a-cancer.html?_r=0


The Superorganism Revolution » American Scientist

January 24, 2015

The Superorganism Revolution
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/num2/the-superorganism-revolution/1 The lack of distinction between ecological v evolutionary change for the #microbiome

QT:{{”
This distinction between ecological and evolutionary timescales appears fundamental, but may not apply when dealing with the microbiome. For many if not all members of the human microbial fauna, generation times are measured in hours or even minutes. These short generation times, coupled with the large population sizes of many bacteria, effectively elide the boundary between ecological and evolutionary time (this attribute also accounts for the fiendish ability of viruses to outrace both the immune system and efforts to combat viral infections).
“}}


Pgenes make proteins

January 24, 2015

Bioinformatics (2015) 31 (1): 33-39. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu615

Making novel proteins from #pseudogenes
http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/33.short Outcomes in 16 cases where one gets stable & functional translated products

http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/31/1/33.short


This Cold House

January 24, 2015

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/24/opinion/this-cold-house.html?smid=tw-nytopinion&_r=0


The Many Guises of Aromaticity » American Scientist

January 23, 2015

The Many Guises of Aromaticity
http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/pub/2015/1/the-many-guises-of-aromaticity #Resonance is hyped; hence, many proposals for compounds w/ it that aren’t benchstable

QT:{{”
Today, an inflation of hype threatens this beautiful concept. Molecules constructed in silico are extolled as possessing surfeits of aromaticity—“doubly aromatic” is a favorite descriptor. Yet the molecules so dubbed have precious little chance of being made in bulk in the laboratory. One can smile at the hype, a gas of sorts, were it not for its volume. A century and a half after the remarkable suggestion of the cyclic structure of benzene, the conceptual value of aromaticity—so useful, so chemical—is in a way dissolving in that hype. Or so it seems to me.

Bench-Stable, Bottleable

Computers made the determination of the structure of molecules in crystals easy—what took half a year in 1960 takes less than an hour today. They also made computations of the stability of molecules facile.

Whoa! What do you mean by stability? Usually what’s computed is stability with respect to decomposition to atoms. But that is pretty meaningless; for instance, of the four homonuclear diatomic molecules (composed of identical atoms) that are most stable with respect to atomization, N2,C2, O2, and P2, two (C2 and P2) are not persistent. You will never see a bottle of them. Nor the tiniest crystal. They are reactive, very much so. In chemistry it’s the barriers to reaction that provide the opportunity to isolate a macroscopic amount of a compound. Ergo the neologism, “bench-stable.” “Bottleable” is another word for the idea. A lifetime of a day at room temperature allows a competent graduate student at the proverbial bench to do a crystal structure and take an NMR scan of a newly made compound. Or put it into a bottle and keep it there for a day, not worrying that it will turn into brown gunk.

“}}


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