The Day the Dinosaurs Died

January 5, 2020

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/04/08/the-day-the-dinosaurs-died

QT:{{”
“When I left Hell Creek, DePalma pressed me on the need for secrecy: I was to tell no one, not even close friends, about what he’d found. The history of paleontology is full of tales of bribery, backstabbing, and double-­dealing. In the nineteenth century, ­Othniel C. Marsh and Edward Drinker Cope, the nation’s two leading paleontologists, engaged in a bitter competition to collect dinosaur fossils in the American West. They raided each other’s quarries, bribed each other’s crews, and vilified each other in print and at scientific meetings. In 1890, the New York Herald began a series of sensational articles about the controversy with the headline “Scientists Wage Bitter Warfare.” The rivalry has since become known as the Bone Wars. The days of skulduggery in paleontology have not passed; DePalma was deeply concerned that the site would be expropriated by a major museum.” “}}

discusses :

A seismically induced onshore surge deposit at the KPg boundary, North Dakota

Robert A. DePalma, Jan Smit, David A. Burnham, Klaudia Kuiper, Phillip L. Manning, Anton Oleinik, Peter Larson, Florentin J. Maurrasse, View ORCID ProfileJohan Vellekoop, Mark A. Richards, Loren Gurche, and Walter Alvarez
PNAS April 23, 2019 116 (17) 8190-8199; first published April 1, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1817407116

https://www.pnas.org/content/116/17/8190