Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

Genetics of the human face: Identification of large-effect single gene variants

February 16, 2018

http://www.pnas.org/content/115/4/E676

sharing your genome on a blockchain

February 11, 2018

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/610221/this-new-company-wants-to-sequence-your-genome-and-let-you-share-it-on-a-blockchain/?utm_campaign=add_this&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=post

Kuwait to require DNA testing of all tourists – Wild About Travel

January 14, 2018

http://wildabouttravel.boardingarea.com/2016/05/12265/

Schumer warns DNA-home tests could be gathering personal info | New York Post

December 3, 2017

https://nypost.com/2017/11/26/schumer-warns-dna-home-tests-could-be-gathering-personal-info/

NOT-OD-17-110: Request for Comments: Proposal to Update Data Management of Genomic Summary Results Under the NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy

December 3, 2017

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-17-110.html

differential privacy

November 29, 2017


Box 1 of the following paper has a nice definition for differential privacy in genomics sense (phenotypic differential privacy): http://www.cell.com/cell-systems/fulltext/S2405-4712(16)30121-1 “

Five Best File Encryption Tools

November 26, 2017

GNU Privacy Guard v VeraCrypt – use w/ dropbox ? ease of install ?

QT:{{”
“VeraCrypt (Windows/OS X/Linux)

VeraCrypt is a fork of and a successor to TrueCrypt, which ceased development last year (more on them later.) The development team claims they’ve addressed some of the issues that were raised during TrueCrypt’s initial security audit, and like the original, it’s free, with versions available for Windows, OS X, and Linux. If you’re looking for a file encryption tool that works like and reminds you of TrueCrypt but isn’t exactly TrueCrypt, this is it. VeraCrypt supports AES (the most commonly used), TwoFish, and Serpent encryption ciphers, supports the creation of hidden, encrypted volumes within other volumes. Its code is available to review, although it’s not strictly open source (because so much of its codebase came from TrueCrypt.) The tool is also under constant development, with regular security updates and an independent audit in the planning stages (according to the developers.)”

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Is Genetic Privacy a Myth?

October 28, 2017

QT:{{”
But it’s the very specificity of genomic data that threatens privacy. Although most genomic databases strip away any information linking a name to a genome, such information is very hard to keep anonymous. “I’m not convinced you can truly de-identify the data,” says Mark Gerstein, a Yale professor who studies large genetic databases and is a fierce privacy advocate. He is concerned about whether even the most cutting-edge protections can safeguard personal data. “I am not a believer that large-scale technical solutions or ‘super-encryption’ will solely work,” he says. “There also needs to be a process for credentialing the individuals who access this data.”

Threats to privacy could multiply once there is an active market for genetic data. Wood speculates that it could be valuable to life insurance companies, which could use it to raise your premiums; or it could become a tool for those who want to prove or disprove paternity. White nationalist groups, who have become preoccupied with genetic testing, might find a way to weaponize the ancestry data the tests can show. It would not be the first time genetic information was used against a race or races. “Genetics has a very troubled history, from Darwin on,” says Yale’s Mark Gerstein.

Yet Columbia’s Yaniv Erlich and others, including Church, fear differential privacy could compromise biomedical research, with smudged data making it harder to get clear results. Mark Gerstein at Yale believes that scientists would be better off testing hypotheses on small amounts of publicly available but pure data, even if it’s not representative of the overall population, rather than using larger quantities of imperfect data.
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Is Genetic Privacy a Myth?
http://protomag.com/articles/genetic-privacy-myth
Genetic tests and genome sequencing are generating terabytes of sensitive private data. How can they be kept safe?

German activities on RNA privacy

October 21, 2017

http://www.mhumbert.com/publications/oakland17.pdf

Identifying Personal DNA Methylation Profiles by Genotype Inference

Michael Backes⇤, Pascal Berrang⇤, Matthias Bieg†, Roland Eils†‡, Carl Herrmann†‡, Mathias Humbert⇤, Irina Lehmann§

Re-Identification of Individuals in Genomic Data-Sharing Beacons via Allele Inference | bioRxiv

October 21, 2017

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/10/09/200147
higher order markov to predict snps