Posts Tagged ‘x78qtcore’

Put your email inbox on a low-spam diet : Naturejobs Blog

April 15, 2018

Put your email inbox on a low-spam diet by @j_perkel
http://blogs.Nature.com/naturejobs/2018/04/11/clean-your-email-inbox-with-a-low-spam-diet/ #Email hygiene for the researcher – ie how to escape fake conference & journal invites + #spam calendar invites
QT:{{”

The practice of publishing their email addresses on journal articles and university web sites makes research academics ready targets for email spammers. Spam, Clemons insists, is not merely a nuisance but a time-sink. Mark Gerstein, a professor of biomedical informatics at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, estimates that maybe a quarter of the 200-or-so messages he receives in a day are important. “I spend many, many, many hours a week, days a week probably, going through my correspondence,” he says.

Gerstein, for instance, uses a multi-tiered approach to triage his correspondence, relying on Gmail filters, labels, and artificial intelligence. Gerstein has a whitelist — a list of ‘approved’ email addresses. Messages from those addresses are automatically routed to his inbox, where they receive the highest priority. New senders can get on that list by placing a special keyword (available on his web site) in the subject line of their message — which is how I was able to contact him.

Below that top tier are departmental messages, messages from mailing lists, and the like. At the very bottom is the obvious spam, the stuff that gets picked up by Google’s spam-detection algorithms. And in the middle is what Gerstein calls ‘almost-spam’ — messages from predatory journals and conferences, spam invitations to join editorial boards, and even spam calendar invites, which automatically add themselves to his calendar and clog up his schedule.

Gerstein advises researchers to use multiple email addresses in dealing with journals, vendors, and the like. Then, by funneling those messages to a single inbox, one can sort the messages by account and prioritize them accordingly.

Gmail is particularly useful for this purpose, Gerstein notes. Suppose you have the address ‘janesci@gmail.com’. Google allows users to modify their addresses by placing a plus sign and additional text between the username and the at-symbol — for instance,
‘janesci+amazon@gmail.com’ and ‘janesci+ebay@gmail.com’. These messages all go to the original address, but users can sort their messages based on the specific address used.

“You can use that quite powerfully to create unique addresses for all sorts of things, and to filter your email on the basis of that,” Gerstein says.

Still, Gerstein admits, spam inevitably falls through the cracks. How to spot it?
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Yale Daily News article about the new Yale Center for Biomedical Data Science (CBDS)

February 10, 2018

Yale establishes biomedical data science center
https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2018/02/09/yale-establishes-biomedical-data-science-center

QT:{{
“The field of data science has become particularly relevant in the biomedical realm — in genomic sequencing, imaging data, patient record data, data on molecules like nucleotides, proteins and metabolites and wearable personal health devices,” Gerstein said. “All of these create data streams that are growing particularly large, and there’s a lot of value in mining and integrating these different data streams.” …

“Although this initiative was started by the medical school, it is meant for the whole campus,” Gerstein said. “We want undergraduates to do research and take courses in biomedical data science — and to be engaged in this center.”
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New Center Formed to Support Biomedical Data Science | Yale School of Medicine

February 4, 2018

http://medicine.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=16666

Inauguration of the Yale Center for Biomedical Data Science

January 30, 2018

http://medicine.yale.edu/news/article.aspx?id=16666

Putting the precise in precision medicine > Features > Autumn 2017 | Yale Medicine

November 22, 2017

http://ymm.yale.edu/autumn2017/features/feature/317720/

QT:{{”
Center co-director Mark B. Gerstein, Ph.D., the Albert L. Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics, explains that succeeding with what researchers term “Big Data” requires “real thought about standards, the uniform collection of data, the distribution of samples, and the presentation and packaging of results.” After three years of planning, Gerstein and co-director Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., a geneticist and the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics, have assembled a kind of central clearinghouse for research and development of these issues, particularly cloud computing and privacy, as well as for education and bridge-building collaboration on university, national, and international levels. “Our mission is really about connecting and coordinating the people and resources already here, and becoming a way to recruit the scientists we want to attract in the future for the Big Data initiatives we want to participate in,” says Gerstein. “We expect the center to have a very broad impact.” “}}

Is Genetic Privacy a Myth?

October 28, 2017

QT:{{”
But it’s the very specificity of genomic data that threatens privacy. Although most genomic databases strip away any information linking a name to a genome, such information is very hard to keep anonymous. “I’m not convinced you can truly de-identify the data,” says Mark Gerstein, a Yale professor who studies large genetic databases and is a fierce privacy advocate. He is concerned about whether even the most cutting-edge protections can safeguard personal data. “I am not a believer that large-scale technical solutions or ‘super-encryption’ will solely work,” he says. “There also needs to be a process for credentialing the individuals who access this data.”

Threats to privacy could multiply once there is an active market for genetic data. Wood speculates that it could be valuable to life insurance companies, which could use it to raise your premiums; or it could become a tool for those who want to prove or disprove paternity. White nationalist groups, who have become preoccupied with genetic testing, might find a way to weaponize the ancestry data the tests can show. It would not be the first time genetic information was used against a race or races. “Genetics has a very troubled history, from Darwin on,” says Yale’s Mark Gerstein.

Yet Columbia’s Yaniv Erlich and others, including Church, fear differential privacy could compromise biomedical research, with smudged data making it harder to get clear results. Mark Gerstein at Yale believes that scientists would be better off testing hypotheses on small amounts of publicly available but pure data, even if it’s not representative of the overall population, rather than using larger quantities of imperfect data.
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Is Genetic Privacy a Myth?
http://protomag.com/articles/genetic-privacy-myth
Genetic tests and genome sequencing are generating terabytes of sensitive private data. How can they be kept safe?

cybersecurity story

August 5, 2017

The absent-minded prof in the news…!

http://www.nature.com/news/cybersecurity-for-the-travelling-scientist-1.22379

Cybersecurity for the travelling scientist

Virtual private networks, tracking apps and ‘burner’ laptops: how to protect sensitive data when you take your research on the road.

Brian Owens

02 August 2017

QT:{{”
Mark Gerstein has had his fair share of scares when it comes to losing track of his electronic devices — and, along with them, access to his private information and research data.

“I’m very security conscious, but also a bit of an absent-minded professor,” says Gerstein, a bioinformatician at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

He recalls one trip to Boston, Massachusetts, when he left his phone in a taxi, and watched it get farther and farther away on the tracking app on his iPad while he ran after the car in vain. Luckily, Gerstein was able to contact the taxi company, and eventually watched his phone make the return journey to his pocket.

Gerstein’s story had a happy ending, but all too often, hardware lost on the road is lost for good.
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YaleNews | Research in the news: Catalogue of human genetic variation revealed

September 30, 2015

http://news.yale.edu/2015/09/30/research-news-catalogue-human-genetic-variation-revealed

Geneticists tap human knockouts

November 1, 2014

Sequenced genomes reveal mutations that disable single genes and can point to new drugs.

Ewen Callaway

28 October 2014 Corrected:
29 October 2014

http://www.nature.com/news/geneticists-tap-human-knockouts-1.16239

You should also read the Corrections to this article
http://www.nature.com/news/geneticists-tap-human-knockouts-1.16239#/correction1

QT:{{”

The poster child for human-knockout efforts is a new class of drugs that block a gene known as PCSK9 (see Nature 496, 152–155; 2013). The gene was discovered in French families with extremely high cholesterol levels in the early 2000s. But researchers soon found that people with rare mutations that inactivate one copy ofPCSK9 have low cholesterol and rarely develop heart disease. The first PCSK9-blocking drugs should hit pharmacies next year, with manufacturers jostling for a share of a market that could reach US$25 billion in five years.

“I think there are hundreds more stories like PCSK9 out there, maybe even thousands,” in which a drug can mimic an advantageous
loss-of-function mutation, says Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, California. Mark Gerstein, a bio­informatician at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, predicts that human knockouts will be especially useful for identifying drugs that treat diseases of ageing. “You could imagine there’s a gene that is beneficial to you as a 25-year-old, but the thing is not doing a good job for you when you’re 75.”

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Genomics Researchers Imagine their Ideal Computer

December 9, 2013

http://chronicle.com/article/Still-Hunting-Medical/143221/

Paul Basken
The Chronicle of Higher Education