Posts Tagged ‘x78qtcore’

Desperately seeking scientists | Nature Index

August 12, 2019

Reunion coverage + Useful suggestion for ORCID that can be done with a secondary email

https://www.natureindex.com/news-blog/one-in-five-email-addresses-researcher-journal-articles-invalid-problem

QT:{{”
Mark Gerstein, the Albert Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, lists over 200 members on his lab’s alumni page, about half of whom were PhD students and postdocs. Recently, he invited many of them to a lab reunion. But first, he had to find them.
“It’s a nontrivial thing keeping track of peoples’ emails,” he says. The lab maintains a database of past members, but he’s now established a LinkedIn group, which has been particularly useful, he says. Former lab members who are on the social network can associate themselves with the lab, thus providing a mechanism for staying in touch. If nothing else, Gerstein notes, he likes to be able to contact lab expats in case there’s ever a question about an old project – for instance, to clarify a protocol or locate a file.

A third solution would be for a third-party ‘scientific directory’ service such as ORCID to add a mechanism for contacting authors, such as a button or form to send a message.
Laure Haak, Executive Director of ORCID, says, “At the current time, ORCID does not have these features on our roadmap.”
In the meantime, it is possible to make the email addresses in an ORCID profile public; go to Account Settings > Email and Notification Preferences, and change “who can see this” from “only me” to “everyone”.
Of course, even were the organization to add a messaging feature, overtaxed researchers may not read them.
“People get so much email,” Gerstein says. “I suspect people would ignore the messages.”
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What the Yale team studied – Marketplace – CBC News

January 19, 2019

https://www.cbc.ca/marketplace/blog/what-the-yale-team-studied

Twins get some ‘mystifying’ results when they put 5 DNA ancestry kits to the test | CBC News

January 19, 2019

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/dna-ancestry-kits-twins-marketplace-1.4980976

(4) Twins get ‘mystifying’ DNA ancestry test results (Marketplace) – YouTube

January 19, 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Isa5c1p6aC0&feature=youtu.be

Massive analysis refines map of autism’s genetic roots | Spectrum | Autism Research News

December 23, 2018

https://www.spectrumnews.org/news/massive-analysis-refines-map-autisms-genetic-roots/

Mapping the Brain’s Genetic Landscape – The New York Times

December 17, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/13/health/genetics-brain-autism-schizophrenia.html

Analysis of 2,000 Brains Provides Clues to Schizophrenia, Autism | The Scientist Magazine(R)

December 15, 2018

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/analysis-of-2-000-brains-provides-clues-to-schizophrenia–autism-65210

Huge brain study uncovers ‘buried’ genetic networks linked to mental illness

December 15, 2018

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07750-x

Huge Brain Study Uncovers “Buried” Genetic Networks Linked to Mental Illness – Scientific American

December 15, 2018

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/huge-brain-study-uncovers-buried-genetic-networks-linked-to-mental-illness/

Put your email inbox on a low-spam diet : Naturejobs Blog

April 15, 2018

Put your email inbox on a low-spam diet by @j_perkel
http://blogs.Nature.com/naturejobs/2018/04/11/clean-your-email-inbox-with-a-low-spam-diet/ #Email hygiene for the researcher – ie how to escape fake conference & journal invites + #spam calendar invites
QT:{{”

The practice of publishing their email addresses on journal articles and university web sites makes research academics ready targets for email spammers. Spam, Clemons insists, is not merely a nuisance but a time-sink. Mark Gerstein, a professor of biomedical informatics at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, estimates that maybe a quarter of the 200-or-so messages he receives in a day are important. “I spend many, many, many hours a week, days a week probably, going through my correspondence,” he says.

Gerstein, for instance, uses a multi-tiered approach to triage his correspondence, relying on Gmail filters, labels, and artificial intelligence. Gerstein has a whitelist — a list of ‘approved’ email addresses. Messages from those addresses are automatically routed to his inbox, where they receive the highest priority. New senders can get on that list by placing a special keyword (available on his web site) in the subject line of their message — which is how I was able to contact him.

Below that top tier are departmental messages, messages from mailing lists, and the like. At the very bottom is the obvious spam, the stuff that gets picked up by Google’s spam-detection algorithms. And in the middle is what Gerstein calls ‘almost-spam’ — messages from predatory journals and conferences, spam invitations to join editorial boards, and even spam calendar invites, which automatically add themselves to his calendar and clog up his schedule.

Gerstein advises researchers to use multiple email addresses in dealing with journals, vendors, and the like. Then, by funneling those messages to a single inbox, one can sort the messages by account and prioritize them accordingly.

Gmail is particularly useful for this purpose, Gerstein notes. Suppose you have the address ‘janesci@gmail.com’. Google allows users to modify their addresses by placing a plus sign and additional text between the username and the at-symbol — for instance,
‘janesci+amazon@gmail.com’ and ‘janesci+ebay@gmail.com’. These messages all go to the original address, but users can sort their messages based on the specific address used.

“You can use that quite powerfully to create unique addresses for all sorts of things, and to filter your email on the basis of that,” Gerstein says.

Still, Gerstein admits, spam inevitably falls through the cracks. How to spot it?
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