Posts Tagged ‘wikipedia’

Pseudoenzyme – Proteopedia, life in 3D

August 2, 2015

QT:{{”
Pseudoenzymes are proteins that cannot catalyze chemical reactions despite being clearly related structurally to functioning enzymes. Many enzyme families contain inactive members. For example, a number of human kinases lack at least one of the key amino acids necessary for catalysis of phosphate transfer [1]. Often pseudoenzymes still have biological roles, albeit non-catalytic. Some assist true enzymes in obtaining functional folds, some server as platforms for other proteins to interact, and some are escorts for proteins [2][3]. “}}

http://proteopedia.org/wiki/index.php/Pseudoenzyme

Dutch famine of 1944 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

August 2, 2015

QT:{{”
Moreover, the children of the women who were pregnant during the famine were smaller, as expected. However, surprisingly, when these children grew up and had children those children were thought to also be smaller than average.[8] These data suggested that the famine experienced by the mothers caused some kind of epigenetic changes that were passed down to the next generation. Despite this, a subsequent study by the same author failed to find a correlation between maternal exposure to famine and birth weight of the next generation.[9] “}}

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_famine_of_1944

Henry Molaison – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

July 12, 2015

QT:{{”
Henry Gustav Molaison (February 26, 1926 – December 2, 2008), known widely asH.M., was an American memory disorder patient who had a bilateral medial temporallobectomy to surgically remove the anterior two thirds of his hippocampi,parahippocampal cortices, entorhinal cortices, piriform cortices, and amygdalae in an attempt to cure his epilepsy. He was widely studied from late 1957 until his death in 2008.[1][2] His case played a very important role in the development of theories that explain the link between brain function and memory, and in the development ofcognitive neuropsychology, a branch of psychology that aims to understand how the structure and function of the brain relates to specific psychological processes. He resided in a care institute located in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, where he was the subject of ongoing investigation.[3]
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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Molaison

Temporal lobe – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

July 12, 2015

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medial_temporal_lobe

Dan David Foundation to award three prizes of $1 million to six world renowned laureates

February 13, 2015

6 individuals will share…Dan David prizes worth $1M
http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Dan-David-Foundation-to-award-three-prizes-of-1-million-to-six-world-renowned-laureates-390602 … #Bioinformatics Prize to C Chothia, D Haussler & M Waterman

Also, Jimmy Wales of Wikipedia fame will get a prize for the Present Information Revolution

Reality distortion field – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 30, 2014

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality_distortion_field

Adele Goldberg (computer scientist) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 28, 2014

QT:{{”
Goldberg began working at PARC in 1973 as a laboratory and research assistant, and eventually became manager of the System Concepts Laboratory where she, Alan Kay, and others developed Smalltalk-80, which both developed the object-oriented approach of Simula 67 and introduced a programming environment of overlapping windows on graphic display screens. Not only was Smalltalk’s innovative format simpler to use, it was also customizable and objects could be transferred among applications with minimal effort.[1][2] Goldberg and Kay also were involved in the development of design templates, forerunners of the design patterns commonly used in software design.[3] In 1988 Goldberg left PARC to co-found ParcPlace Systems, a company that created development tools for Smalltalk-based applications.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adele_Goldberg_(computer_scientist)

Supposedly incensed at the “kimono opening”, viz

QT:{{”

Apple was already one of the hottest tech firms in the country. Everyone in the Valley wanted a piece of it. So Jobs proposed a deal: he would allow Xerox to buy a hundred thousand shares of his company for a million dollars—its highly anticipated I.P.O. was just a year away—if PARC would “open its kimono.” A lot of haggling ensued. Jobs was the fox, after all, and PARC was the henhouse. What would he be allowed to see? What wouldn’t he be allowed to see? Some at PARC thought that the whole idea was lunacy, but, in the end, Xerox went ahead with it. One PARC scientist recalls Jobs as “rambunctious”—a fresh-cheeked, caffeinated version of today’s austere digital emperor. He was given a couple of tours, and he ended up standing in front of a Xerox Alto, PARC’s prized personal computer.
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http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2011/05/16/creation-myth

Bill Atkinson – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 28, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Atkinson

http://archive.org/stream/byte-magazine-1984-02/1984_02_BYTE_09-02_Benchmarks#page/n59/mode/2up

Newly created photocard, viz:
http://www.billatkinson.com/Pages/aboutPhotoCard.html

Is it related to the original HyperCard?

Apple Lisa – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 28, 2014

QT:{{”

While the documentation shipped with the original Lisa only ever referred to it as The Lisa, officially, Apple stated the name was an acronym for Local IntegratedSystem Architecture or “LISA”.[6] Since Steve Jobs’ first daughter (born in 1978) was named Lisa Nicole Brennan, it was normally inferred that the name also had a personal association, and perhaps that the acronym was invented later to fit the name. Andy Hertzfeld[7] states the acronym was reverse engineered from the name “Lisa” in autumn 1982 by the Apple marketing team, after they had hired a marketing consultancy firm to come up with names to replace “Lisa” and “Macintosh” (at the time considered by Jef Raskin to be merely internal project codenames) and then rejected all of the suggestions. Privately, Hertzfeld and the other software developers used “Lisa: Invented Stupid Acronym”, a recursive backronym, while computer industry pundits coined the term “Let’s Invent Some Acronym” to fit the Lisa’s name. Decades later, Jobs would tell his biographer Walter Isaacson: “Obviously it was named for my daughter.”[8] “}}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Lisa

Lawrence Roberts (scientist) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 22, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Roberts_%28scientist%29