Archive for the '–' Category

Shedding light on the dark proteome

April 24, 2017

QT:{{”
“The dark proteome could be an evolutionary playground for trying out new folds

Ultimately one would expect particularly useful variations to get fixed at the genetic level. But it needn’t be where that variation begins. What’s more, organisms needn’t be quite so dependent for their molecular repertoire on their evolutionary heritage. O’Donoghue thinks that all organisms probably have a significant fraction of proteins unique just to them.

‘The fact that the dark matter of the proteome has less evolutionary constraint than the other bits of proteome may suggest that it’s under less selection,’ says Gerstein. ‘This is perhaps because it’s more flexible structurally, but also in a sense more flexible in terms of accommodating various amino-acid changes compared to the structurally inflexible and fixed parts of the crystallised proteome.’ This adds momentum to the picture of genomics as a rather more fluid affair than is suggested by the old picture of identical proteins being
mass-produced from a fixed genetic template.

Gerstein feels that studying the dark proteome opens up a host of interesting questions. For example, although known bacteria have a smaller dark proteome than eukaryotes, there’s a huge ‘dark
microbiome’ of unculturable bacteria. Might that be more full of dark proteins – perhaps useful ones?

And what about us? ‘How does the human dark proteome compare to that of eukaryotes as a whole?’ Gerstein wonders. How well, really, do we know ourselves?”
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Shedding light on the dark proteome
BY PHILIP BALL13 FEBRUARY 2017
https://www.chemistryworld.com/feature/shedding-light-on-the-dark-proteome/2500392.article

Edward Oxford – Wikipedia

April 24, 2017

[tags victoria0mg,uk20c,uk19c]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Oxford

High-Tech Hope for the Hard of Hearing – The New Yorker

April 23, 2017

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/04/03/high-tech-hope-for-the-hard-of-hearing/amp

Mind the gaps: The holes in your brain that make you smart | New Scientist

April 23, 2017

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23331180-300-mind-the-gaps-the-holes-in-your-brain-that-make-you-smart/

Jacques Bar | Best Hotel Bars NYC | The Lowell Hotel

April 23, 2017

https://www.lowellhotel.com/restaurants-and-bar/jacques-bar/57-2/

Can we hit the snooze button on aging? | March 6, 2017 Issue – Vol. 95 Issue 10 | Chemical & Engineering News

April 23, 2017

Can we hit the snooze button on #aging?
http://CEN.acs.org/articles/95/i10/hit-snooze-button-aging.html Various ways to tackle this timeless issue; for me more pertinent by the day

A Lesson From the Henrietta Lacks Story: Science Needs Your Cells – The New York Times

April 23, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/21/opinion/henrietta-lacks-why-science-needs-your-cells.html?_r=0

A.I. Versus M.D. – The New Yorker

April 23, 2017

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/04/03/ai-versus-md

Is It Time to Break Up Google? – The New York Times

April 22, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/22/opinion/sunday/is-it-time-to-break-up-google.html?smid=tw-nytopinion&smtyp=cur&_r=1

The Predictive Capacity of Personal Genome Sequencing

April 22, 2017

The Predictive Capacity of Personal Genome Sequencing
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/03/health/research/dnas-power-to-predict-is-limited-study-finds.html?_r=2&hp [tag quote]

QT:{{”

If every aspect of a person’s DNA is known, would it be possible to predict the diseases in that person’s future? And could that knowledge be used to forestall the otherwise inevitable?

The answer, according to a new study of twins, is, for the most part, “no.”

While sequencing the entire DNA of individuals is proving
fantastically useful in understanding diseases and finding new treatments, it is not a method that will, for the most part, predict a person’s medical future.

So, the new study concludes, it is not going to be possible to say that, for example, Type 2 diabetes will occur with absolute certainty unless a person keeps a normal weight, or that colon cancer is a foregone conclusion without frequent screening and removal of polyps. Conversely, it will not be possible to tell some people that they can ignore all the advice about, for example, preventing a heart attack because they will never get one.

“The punch line is that this sort of personalized medicine will not in any way be the most important determinant of patient care,” said Dr. Bert Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins, who, with his colleagues and his son Joshua, analyzed the power of sequencing all of a person’s DNA to determine an individual’s risk of disease. The study, published online Monday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, involved data from 53,666 identical twins in registries from the United States, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Norway. The registries included data on 24 diseases, telling how often one twin, both or neither got a disease.
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