Archive for the 'x78qt' Category

Putting the precise in precision medicine > Features > Autumn 2017 | Yale Medicine

November 22, 2017

http://ymm.yale.edu/autumn2017/features/feature/317720/

QT:{{”
Center co-director Mark B. Gerstein, Ph.D., the Albert L. Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics, explains that succeeding with what researchers term “Big Data” requires “real thought about standards, the uniform collection of data, the distribution of samples, and the presentation and packaging of results.” After three years of planning, Gerstein and co-director Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., a geneticist and the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics, have assembled a kind of central clearinghouse for research and development of these issues, particularly cloud computing and privacy, as well as for education and bridge-building collaboration on university, national, and international levels. “Our mission is really about connecting and coordinating the people and resources already here, and becoming a way to recruit the scientists we want to attract in the future for the Big Data initiatives we want to participate in,” says Gerstein. “We expect the center to have a very broad impact.” “}}

cybersecurity story

August 5, 2017

The absent-minded prof in the news…!

http://www.nature.com/news/cybersecurity-for-the-travelling-scientist-1.22379

Cybersecurity for the travelling scientist

Virtual private networks, tracking apps and ‘burner’ laptops: how to protect sensitive data when you take your research on the road.

Brian Owens

02 August 2017

QT:{{”
Mark Gerstein has had his fair share of scares when it comes to losing track of his electronic devices — and, along with them, access to his private information and research data.

“I’m very security conscious, but also a bit of an absent-minded professor,” says Gerstein, a bioinformatician at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

He recalls one trip to Boston, Massachusetts, when he left his phone in a taxi, and watched it get farther and farther away on the tracking app on his iPad while he ran after the car in vain. Luckily, Gerstein was able to contact the taxi company, and eventually watched his phone make the return journey to his pocket.

Gerstein’s story had a happy ending, but all too often, hardware lost on the road is lost for good.
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Quick comment on AI for pharma?

July 18, 2017

Please find the article at link:
https://www.pharma-iq.com/informatics/articles/is-big-pharma-really-on-cusp-of-ai-shake-out-0

Is big pharma really on cusp of AI shake-out?

By: Pharma IQ
Posted: 07/14/2017

QT:{{”

The promises of “disruptive technologies” have failed to live up to expectations in the past. For example, the development of ‘high throughput screening’ – a process that employs robotics to conduct millions of chemical, genetic and pharmacological tests in rapid time – in the 1990s failed to significantly reduce R&D inefficiencies and offered sporadic success rates.

“The major cost in drug R&D is last-phase clinical trials,” said Dr Mark Gerstein, professor of biomedical informatics at Yale University. “It is not clear whether AI can be as useful for these as it has been in target selection for the initial phases.”

“One of the first principles of data mining is that history is a good predictor of the future. AI has a track record of not living up to its expectations and therefore caution about how great its impact will be in the healthcare industry is now warranted.”
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Archives | HCR Clarivate Analytics

November 21, 2016

Thomson Reuters HIGHLY CITED RESEARCHERS (HCR) List

ON:
2016_HCR_as_of_November_16_2016.xlsx
2015_HCR_as_of_December_1_2015.xlsx
2014_HCR_as_of_September_8_2015.xlsx
2014_HCR_List_as_of_December_31_2014.xlsx

2016 HCR List as of November 16 2016
2015 HCR List as of December 1 2015
2014 HCR List as of December 31 2014
2014 HCR as of September 8 2015

NOT-ON:
2001_HCR_List_as_of_December_31_2001.xlsx
2001_HCR_as_of_September_8_2015.xlsx

2001 HCR List as of December 31 2001
2001 HCR as of September 8 2015

http://hcr.stateofinnovation.thomsonreuters.com/page/archives http://hcr.stateofinnovation.thomsonreuters.com/

Steven Girvin, Robert Schoelkopf, and Nikhil Padmanabhan among the most influential scientific minds of 2015 | Department of Physics

February 21, 2016

MG mentioned on
http://physics.yale.edu/news/steven-girvin-robert-schoelkopf-and-nikhil-padmanabhan-among-most-influential-scientific-minds Thomson Reuter’s
THE WORLD’S MOST INFLUENTIAL SCIENTIFIC MINDS 2015
in 2 categories: Biochem & Genetics

YaleNews | Making ‘miniature brains’ from skin cells to better understand autism

November 16, 2015

http://news.yale.edu/2015/07/20/making-miniature-brains-skin-cells-better-understand-autism

YaleNews | Research in the news: Catalogue of human genetic variation revealed

September 30, 2015

http://news.yale.edu/2015/09/30/research-news-catalogue-human-genetic-variation-revealed

YaleNews | Yale researchers to participate in study of the genetics of ‘multi-substance use’ among veterans

July 21, 2015

http://news.yale.edu/yale-researchers-participate-study-genetics-multi-substance-use-among-veterans

Microbiome Fingerprints | The Scientist Magazine(R)

May 17, 2015

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/42950/title/Microbiome-Fingerprints/

QT:{{”

As microbiome signatures mature, law enforcement or intelligence agents could theoretically track people by looking for traces of them left in the microbes they shed. Mark Gerstein, who studies biomedical informatics at Yale University and was not involved in the new study, suggested, for instance, that one could imagine tracking a terrorist’s movements through caves using their microbiome signature.

Huttenhower and his colleagues were identifying individuals out of pools of just hundreds of project participants, however. It is currently unclear how well the algorithm will perform when applied to the general population, though the researchers estimate that their code could likely pick someone out from a group of 500 to 1,000. “I would expect that number to get bigger in the future as we get more data and better data and better coding strategies,” Huttenhower said.

But the work raises privacy concerns similar to those faced by scientists gather human genomic data. Microbiome researchers are already wary of the human genomic DNA that gets caught up in microbiome sequences, but it increasingly appears that the microbiome sequences themselves are quite personal.

In the genomics field, researchers have increasingly limited access to databases containing human genomic sequencing data. Researchers must apply to use these data. “People might increasingly want to put the microbiome data under the same type of protection that they put normal genomic variants under,” said Gerstein. “Your microbiome is associated with various disease risks and proclivities for X and Y. I don’t think it’s a completely neutral identification. It potentially says things about you.”

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SEAS receives $20 million donation | Yale Daily News

March 29, 2015

http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2015/03/26/seas-receives-20-million-donation/