Posts Tagged ‘diet’

Death of the calorie | 1843

April 17, 2019

https://www.1843magazine.com/features/death-of-the-calorie

QT:[[”
This was pioneering stuff for the 1890s. Atwater eventually concluded that a gram of either carbohydrate or protein made an average of four calories of energy available to the body, and a gram of fat offered an average of 8.9 calories, a figure later rounded up to nine calories for convenience. We now know far more about the workings of the human body: Atwater was right that some of a meal’s potential energy was excreted, but had no idea that some was also used to digest the meal itself, and that the body expends different amounts of energy depending on the food. Yet more than a century after igniting the faeces of Wesleyan students, the numbers Atwater calculated for each macro­nutrient remain the standard for measuring the calories in any given food stuff. Those experiments were the basis of Salvador Camacho’s daily calorific arithmetic.
“]]

Wine: From the Lightest to the Strongest | Wine Folly

January 13, 2019

https://winefolly.com/tutorial/the-lightest-to-the-strongest-wine/

some light ones {{”
Kabinett Riesling 8% ABV (light sweet German Riesling)
Spätlese Riesling 8.5% ABV (rich sweet German Riesling)
Muscadet 9.5% ABV (France)
Pinot Grigio (Italy)
“}}

No sweat: The smart guide to exercise | New Scientist

August 18, 2018

No sweat: The smart guide to exercise
https://www.NewScientist.com/round-up/no-sweat/ Useful tidbits related to scientific studies of #exercise: stretching has not proven useful. 150 min/week is good &half that in HIT, even better

yogurt probiotics survival after freezing

February 5, 2018

QT:{{”
not finding very good data on how much of the bacteria will survive freezing in yogurt.
This “ask the professor” column matches intuition.
“}}

http://tuftsjournal.tufts.edu/2008/06/professor/01/

However, these two sources say there’s no loss in viability… https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022030200749277?via%3Dihub

Holcomb et al. (1991) reported that both L. acidophilus and
Bifidobacterium were able to survive and grow in soft-serve frozen yogurt after freezing [Holcomb, J.E., Frank, J.F. and McGregor, J.U. (1991), Viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum in soft-serve frozen yogurt. Cult. Dairy Prod. J. 26, 4-5.]

pre-frozen yogurt can contain active cultures — just have to check the label.

How Long Does Yogurt Last? Shelf Life, Storage, Expiration

December 16, 2017

“Yogurt Expiration Date

(Unopened) Refrigerator Freezer
Frozen Yogurt lasts for — 2-3 Months
Drinkable Yogurt lasts for 7-10 Days, 1-2 Months
Reduced Fat Yogurt lasts for 1-2 Weeks, 1-2 Months
Yogurt With Fruit lasts for 7-10 Days, 1-2 Months


All yogurt manufacturers that we checked with guarantee their product quality for 7 days beyond the printed sell by date

How to tell if Yogurt is bad, rotten or spoiled?


Although not a perfect test, your senses are usually the most reliable instruments to tell if your yogurt has gone bad. A small amount of liquid is ok in most yogurts, it is called whey and actually contains several nutrients that should be mixed into the yogurt before eating. But an increased amount of surface liquid (or, in the case of Yoplait yogurt and a few others that do not have any excess liquid to begin with, it’s when a puddle begins to form) and a curdling texture near the bottom of the container are the first signs of yogurt going bad. The final signal that your yogurt has indeed gone bad is the formation of mold and at that point you must throw the entire container away, no matter what. Live bacterial cultures in yogurt act as a preservative, but once those cultures start to die off then mold can start to form. Never consume mold in any shape or form!”
“}}

Sweet taste, not just calories, dictates metabolic response | YaleNews

September 30, 2017

Sweet taste, not just calories, dictates metabolic response
https://News.Yale.edu/2017/08/10/sweet-taste-not-just-calories-dictates-metabolic-response May explain link betw. diabetes & artificial #sweeteners

QT:{{”
“When sweet taste and calories do not align, the body’s metabolism is fooled, a finding that may help explain the link between artificial sweetener use and diabetes, a new Yale University study has found.” “}}

Are You a Carboholic? Why Cutting Carbs Is So Tough – The New York Times

July 25, 2017

QT:{{”
The conventional thinking, held by the large proportion of the many researchers and clinicians I’ve interviewed over the years, is that obesity is caused by caloric excess. They refer to it as an “energy balance” disorder, and so the treatment is to consume less energy (fewer calories) and expend more. When we fail to maintain this prescription, the implication is that we simply lack will power or self-discipline.

“It’s viewed as a psychological issue or even a question of
character,” says Dr. David Ludwig, who studies and treats obesity at Harvard Medical School.

The minority position in this field — one that Dr. Ludwig holds, as do I after years of reporting — is that obesity is actually a hormonal regulatory disorder, and the hormone that dominates this process is insulin. It directly links what we eat to the accumulation of excess fat and that, in turn, is tied to the foods we crave and the hunger we experience. It’s been known since the 1960s that insulin signals fat cells to accumulate fat, while telling the other cells in our body to burn carbohydrates for fuel. By this thinking these carbohydrates are uniquely fattening.

“}}

Are You a Carboholic? Why Cutting #Carbs Is So Tough
https://www.NYTimes.com/2017/07/19/well/eat/are-you-a-carboholic-why-cutting-carbs-is-so-tough.html #Obesity as an energy-balance v hormonal-regulatory disorder

Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Chart

July 22, 2017

http://alsearsmd.com/glycemic-index/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/riva-greenberg/gl-and-gi_b_863126.html

QT:{{"
Q: What is glycemic load in very simple terms?
Susan Weiner: Glycemic load is a ranking system for carbohydrate-rich food that measures the amount of carbohydrates in a serving of food.
Foods with a glycemic load (GL) under 10 are considered low-GL foods and have little impact on your blood sugar; between 10 and 20 moderate-GL foods with moderate impact on blood sugar, and above 20 high-GL foods that tend to cause blood sugar spikes.
Q: How is glycemic load related to glycemic index?
SW: The glycemic index indicates how rapidly a carbohydrate is digested and released as glucose (sugar) into the blood stream. In other words, how quickly foods break down into sugar in your bloodstream. A food with a high GI raises blood sugar more than a food with a medium to low GI.
But the glycemic index does not take into account the amount of carbohydrate in a food. So glycemic load is a better indicator of how a carbohydrate food will affect blood sugar.
"}}

Kimchi – Wikipedia

July 18, 2017

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimchi

Public health: The toxic truth about sugar : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

July 18, 2017

The toxic truth about #sugar
http://www.Nature.com/nature/journal/v482/n7383/full/482027a.html Argues for regulation like alcohol & tobacco, making it harder to get, esp. for kids