Posts Tagged ‘quote’

Putting the precise in precision medicine > Features > Autumn 2017 | Yale Medicine

November 22, 2017

http://ymm.yale.edu/autumn2017/features/feature/317720/

QT:{{”
Center co-director Mark B. Gerstein, Ph.D., the Albert L. Williams Professor of Biomedical Informatics, explains that succeeding with what researchers term “Big Data” requires “real thought about standards, the uniform collection of data, the distribution of samples, and the presentation and packaging of results.” After three years of planning, Gerstein and co-director Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., a geneticist and the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics, have assembled a kind of central clearinghouse for research and development of these issues, particularly cloud computing and privacy, as well as for education and bridge-building collaboration on university, national, and international levels. “Our mission is really about connecting and coordinating the people and resources already here, and becoming a way to recruit the scientists we want to attract in the future for the Big Data initiatives we want to participate in,” says Gerstein. “We expect the center to have a very broad impact.” “}}

Tokyo Is Preparing for Floods ‘Beyond Anything We’ve Seen’

November 22, 2017

Tokyo Is Preparing for Floods ‘Beyond Anything We’ve Seen’
https://www.NYTimes.com/2017/10/06/climate/tokyo-floods.html Quote: “Extreme rainfall, along with the potential for destructive
earthquakes & tsunamis, make Tokyo…the riskiest metropolitan area in the world.”

QT:{{”
“Extreme rainfall, along with the potential for destructive
earthquakes and tsunamis, make Tokyo and the neighboring port city of Yokohama the riskiest metropolitan area in the world, according to a 2014 study of natural disaster risks by the Swiss Re reinsurance firm.

In late 2015, heavy typhoon rains wreaked havoc across greater Tokyo, forcing a record 670 million cubic feet of water into the underground facility, known as the Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge Channel. It took four days for the site’s four large pumps — powered by engines similar to those used in a Boeing 737 jet — to clear the deluge.

“Tokyo faces dangers on all sides,” said Nobuyuki Tsuchiya, an anti-flooding expert and the former head of civil engineering for Tokyo’s flood-prone Edogawa ward. “It’s difficult to say that it’s doing enough.””
“}}

Winter is Coming

November 22, 2017

QT:{{”
Choose the Right Clothes Wear loose, lightweight, warm clothes in layers. Trapped air insulates. Remove layers to avoid perspiration and subsequent chill. Outer garments should be tightly woven, water repellent, and hooded. Wear a hat. Half of your body heat loss can occur from the head. Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold. Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves. Try to stay dry. Wear sturdy waterproof and slip resistant boots or shoes. You will spend a lot of time outside walking to and from your classes or your lab and wearing warm gear is key to your safety and comfort. Understand the Hazards  Wind Chill: How wind and cold feel on exposed skin (this is not the actual temperature). As the wind increases, heat is carried away from your body at an accelerated rate, driving down your body temperature.
“}}
http://ehs.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/Safety-Bulletins/nov2017.pdf

Winds of change – Infographics

November 18, 2017

Winds of change
https://www.Economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21580446-revolution-taking-place-how-visualise-information-winds-change Good quotes on #InfoGraphics: “Visualization is a continuous spectrum that stretches from statistical graphics to #dataart” + “Data journalism, the idea is that reporters must interrogate both people & databases…to get their information.”

QT:{{”
For that is what data-visualisations are: a blend of the aesthetic and informational. Having one without the other means producing something that is less useful and enjoyable than it might be, argues Nathan Yau, a statistician who runs a blog called FlowingData.com. Visualisation is a whole new medium, he writes in his new book, “Data Points”. It is a “continuous spectrum that stretches from statistical graphics to data art”.

“Data Points” is a useful primer for those who need to produce infographics. But for those who merely want to appreciate them, two other books fit the bill, both by Guardian journalists.

In recent years the London-based daily newspaper has promoted a new area called “data journalism”. The idea is that reporters must interrogate both people and databases in order to get their
information. Simon Rogers’s “Facts Are Sacred” is a review of the past few years’ worth of this data journalism on the paper’s website. It brings together some of its best projects and explains how they were done.
“}}

The future of DNA sequencing

November 14, 2017

The Future of DNA Seq.
http://www.Nature.com/news/the-future-of-dna-sequencing-1.22787 Apps v Tech. QT: “Platforms for…#sequencing have changed dramatically…Yet the trajectories of other technologies…Internet, digital
photography…suggest…real disrupters will be the resulting applications, not the new tech”

QT:{{”
Killer applications –
Over the years, the platforms for DNA sequencing have changed dramatically (see ”). Yet the trajectories of other technologies for which there is a seemingly insatiable demand — smartphones, the Internet, digital photography — suggest that the real disrupters will be the resulting applications, not the new technologies.

“}}

Quantifying the local resolution of cryo-EM density maps | Nature Methods

November 14, 2017

Quantifying the local resolution of #cryoEM density maps
https://www.Nature.com/articles/nmeth.2727 “Theory…based on the following idea: a L Angstrom feature exists at a pt…if a 3D local sinusoid of wavelength L is statistically detectable above noise at that point.”

QT:{{”
We propose a mathematical theory and an efficient algorithm for measuring local resolution that address all of the above limitations. The theory (Online Methods) is based on the following idea: a λ-Å feature exists at a point in the volume if a three-dimensional (3D) local sinusoid of wavelength λ is statistically detectable above noise at that point. A likelihood-ratio hypothesis test of the local sinusoid versus noise can detect this feature at a given P value (typically P = 0.05). We define the local resolution at a point as the smallest λ at which the local sinusoid is detectable, and we account for multiple testing with an FDR procedure.
“}}

New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of Deep Learning | Quanta Magazine

November 12, 2017

New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of #DeepLearning
https://www.QuantaMagazine.org/new-theory-cracks-open-the-black-box-of-deep-learning-20170921/ Highlights the importance of a compression phase for generalization

QT:{{”
“Then learning switches to the compression phase. The network starts to shed information about the input data, keeping track of only the strongest features — those correlations that are most relevant to the output label. This happens because, in each iteration of stochastic gradient descent, more or less accidental correlations in the training data tell the network to do different things, dialing the strengths of its neural connections up and down in a random walk. This
randomization is effectively the same as compressing the system’s representation of the input data. As an example”
“}}

Why these powerful health care gurus left the East Coast for California

November 11, 2017

Why these powerful health care gurus left the East Coast for California https://www.StatNews.com/2017/11/06/california-startup-culture/ Quotes T Insel, ex-director of NIMH: “What I was doing was providing lots of additional funding to people whose major goal was to get a paper in Nature & get tenure.”

““What I was doing was providing lots of additional funding to people whose major goal was to get a paper in Nature and get tenure.” Dr. Tom Insel, Mindstrong Health co-founder”

Reading by the Numbers: When Big Data Meets Literature

November 11, 2017

Reading by the Numbers: When #BigData Meets Literature
https://www.NYTimes.com/2017/10/30/arts/franco-moretti-stanford-literary-lab-big-data.html Distant reading as a complement to close reading for literary texts. Perhaps a useful dichotomy for biosequences too!

QT:{{”
“Literary criticism typically tends to emphasize the singularity of exceptional works that have stood the test of time. But the canon, Mr. Moretti argues, is a distorted sample. Instead, he says, scholars need to consider the tens of thousands of books that have been forgotten, a task that computer algorithms and enormous digitized databases have now made possible.

“We know how to read texts,” he wrote in a much-quoted essay included in his book “Distant Reading,” which won the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. “Now let’s learn how to not read them.””

“}}

Cancer’s Invasion Equation

October 30, 2017

Cancer’s Invasion Eqn, by @DrSidMukherjee
https://www.NewYorker.com/magazine/2017/09/11/cancers-invasion-equation terms: Soil-v-seed, metastasis matching + overcoming “denominator” problem

QT:{{”

“This is medicine’s “denominator problem.” The numerator is you—the person who gets ill. The denominator is everyone at risk, including all the other passengers who were exposed. Numerators are easy to study. Denominators are hard. Numerators come to the doctor’s office, congested and miserable. They get blood tests and prescriptions. Denominators go home from the subway station, heat up dinner, and watch “The Strain.” The numerator persists. The denominator vanishes.” “}}