Posts Tagged ‘quote’

WikiLeaks Shows How the CIA Can Hack a Mac’s Hidden Code

March 25, 2017

WikiLeaks Shows How the CIA Can Hack a Mac
https://www.wired.com/2017/03/wikileaks-shows-cia-can-hack-macs-hidden-code/ Modifying the firmware of Thunderbolt adapters to make spyware implanters

QT:{{”
“The CIA’s documents describe a series of tools that agents can use to install “implants” on target machines, capable of silently monitoring everything that occurs within its operating system and transmitting it to a remote operator. One manual explains how to modify the firmware of a standard Apple Thunderbolt-to-ethernet adapter, turniing it into an spyware-planting tool the CIA calls “Sonic Screwdriver.” When plugged in, the altered adapter can trick a Mac into thinking it’s booting its operating from a spoofed network source that the adapter impersonates, allowing tweaks to its firmware even in the rare cases when the user has set a password for any changes to that deep-seated code.”
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Education in Computational Biology Today and Tomorrow

March 25, 2017

Education in #CompBio, by @bffo & @joannealisonfox
http://journals.PLOS.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003391 Keeping up in a rapidly changing field. Will implement some @Yale

QT:{{”
“These initiatives help to extend computational biology beyond the domain of specialized laboratories. Researchers, at all levels, need to keep themselves up-to-date with the quickly changing world of computational biology, and trainees need programs where bioinformatics skills are embedded so they can have comprehensive training. New bioinformatics workflows can be adopted more widely if education efforts keep pace. As previously pointed out , starting early is also very important. There is still room for programs that capture the excitement and enthusiasm of secondary school students and convey the potential of computational biology to the public. We welcome additions to the PLOS Computational Biology “Bioinformatics: Starting Early” collection (www.ploscollections.org/cbstartingearly).

We would like to involve the community in this endeavor. With this editorial, we are calling out to educators and researchers who have experience in teaching, specifically, those keen to raise the expectations and the inquisitiveness of the next generation of biologists. The Education collection will continue to publish leading edge education materials in the form of tutorials that can be used in a “classroom” setting (whatever that may mean nowadays: stated more generically, “the places where people learn”). We will continue to encourage articles set in the context of addressing a particular biological question and, as mentioned above, we welcome new “primers” and “quick guides.” We will also be inviting tutorials from the various computational meetings. A new category of papers that is in the pipeline for the Education collection is the “Quick Tips” format, the first of which was just published . The “Quick Tips” articles address specific tools or databases that are in wide use in the community.
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See how old Amazon’s AI thinks you are

March 23, 2017

See how old $AMZN’s AI thinks you are
http://www.theVerge.com/2017/2/10/14582192/amazon-ai-rekognition-age-guess-software Free via image Rekognition platform, in the dev toolkit part of @AWScloud

QT:{{”
“Amazon’s latest artificial intelligence tool is a piece of image recognition software that can learn to guess a human’s age. The feature is powered by Amazon’s Rekognition platform, which is a developer toolkit that exists as part of the company’s AWS cloud computing service. So long as you’re willing to go through the process of signing up for a basic AWS account — that entails putting in credit card info but Amazon won’t charge you — you can try the age-guessing software for yourself.”
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Are You My Cousin?

March 20, 2017

Are You My Cousin?
http://www.NYTimes.com/2014/02/01/opinion/sunday/are-you-my-cousin.html Combination of noisy crowd-sourced #ancestry & @23andMe linkages may connect everyone in a tree

QT:{{”
“The farther you go back, the more quantum it gets. According to Geni, my 97th great-grandfather is King David from the Bible. So what are the chances that I’m actually a direct descendant of the Goliath slayer? Count me a highly doubting Thomas. But it’s still fun to dive into the research and try to verify it.

In addition to using crowd-sourced trees, I’m trying to build my family list with genetic testing. I recently sent my saliva off to 23andMe (the F.D.A. has suspended the health-related part of 23andMe, but the ancestry service remains open). The result? I found more than a thousand fellow spitters who share enough genetic material that 23andMe says we are probable cousins. One such distant cousin: my wife. This was a tad jarring. Not to mention that it set off an avalanche of bad inbreeding and hillbilly jokes from friends. But the truth is, my wife and I aren’t unusual.
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pseudogenes that might have saved us !

March 20, 2017

#Pseudogenes that might have saved us!
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120604155554.htm?fb_ref=.T829TjfxGmI.like&fb_source=home_oneline Interesting link to infectious disease for pseudo-siglecs 13 & 17

QT:{{”
“”In a small, restricted population, a single mutation can have a big effect, a rare allele can get to high frequency,” said senior author Ajit Varki, MD, professor of medicine and cellular and molecular medicine and co-director of the Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny at UC San Diego. “We’ve found two genes that are non-functional in humans, but not in related primates, which could have been targets for bacterial pathogens particularly lethal to newborns and infants. Killing the very young can have a major impact upon reproductive fitness. Species survival can then depend upon either resisting the pathogen or on eliminating the target proteins it uses to gain the upper hand.”

In this case, Varki, who is also director of the UC San Diego Glycobiology Research and Training Center, and colleagues in the United States, Japan and Italy, propose that the latter occurred. Specifically, they point to inactivation of two sialic acid-recognized signaling receptors (siglecs) that modulate immune responses and are part of a larger family of genes believed to have been very active in human evolution.

Working with Victor Nizet, MD, professor of pediatrics and pharmacy, Varki’s group had previously shown that some pathogens can exploit siglecs to alter the host immune responses in favor of the microbe. In the latest study, the scientists found that the gene for Siglec-13 was no longer part of the modern human genome, though it remains intact and functional in chimpanzees, our closest evolutionary cousins. The other siglec gene — for Siglec-17 — was still expressed in humans, but it had been slightly tweaked to make a short, inactive protein of no use to invasive pathogens.”
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Does Trump Really Have the Best Words?

March 12, 2017

Does Trump…Have the Best Words?
http://www.LitCharts.com/analitics/inaugural #Lexical analysis of 58 inaugurals; words/sent., we-v-I & will-v-shall usage, &c

QT:{{”
“V. Inaugural Language Has Kept Up With the Times

Modern inaugurals are less complex than early inaugurals, but not at the cost of lexical richness. Presidents aren’t exactly dumbing things down for us–they don’t assume we have limited vocabularies–but they are trying to speak our language. So they tend to use words that fit the current vernacular.

Take, for example, the choice to use “will” or “shall”:
To Americans, “shall” began to sound outmoded (or perhaps British) somewhere around World War II, and presidents pretty much stopped using it. “Will” has the same imperative force, but doesn’t clang as much to modern ears.

Mr. Trump, who has an ear for vernacular, didn’t use “shall” at all in his speech. Instead, he used “will” a record-breaking 43 times, and its prevalence was plain as he declared his intention to upend Washington politics, reinforce borders, and turn us into winners in what he sees as a zero-sum world:

….
In addition to “we,” Mr. Trump also hit the word “America” pretty hard. If you compare the use of “America,” “American,” and
“Americans,” to “citizenship,” “citizen,” and “citizens,” you’ll see that this tendency is also part of a trend:”
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Peter Mansfield, M.R.I. Pioneer and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 83

March 12, 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/11/science/peter-mansfield-dead-nobel-prize-magnetic-resonance-imaging.html
QT:{{"
“Later, in 1972, as he worked to refine and sharpen N.M.R. data, he had a conversation with two colleagues about what applications such advances might lead to. He soon realized that if an object were placed in a nonuniform magnetic field — one that is stronger at one end than the other — scientists might be able to piece together a three-dimensional image of its atomic structure.”
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Lexus RX450H: How to jump start lexus RX 450H?

March 10, 2017

http://www.justanswer.com/lexus/734j6-lexus-rx450h-jump-start-lexus-rx-450h.html

QT:{{"
The most direct way to jump this car is directly at the 12 volt battery which is located to the left of the spare tire underneath the luggage compartment door in the back

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Fighting Hearing Loss From the Crowd’s Roar

March 9, 2017

Fighting #Hearing Loss From the Crowd’s Roar
http://Well.blogs.NYTimes.com/2013/11/20/fighting-hearing-loss-from-the-crowds-roar/ Silent, cumulative loss from the effect of loud sounds over a lifetime

QT:{{”
Ears are deceptive. Even if they seem to recover from the muffling, ringing and fullness after a rousing game, they don’t really recover. It’s not just the tiny sensory cells in the cochlea that are damaged by noise, Dr. Liberman said, but also the nerve fibers between the ears and the brain that degrade over time.
Too much noise causes not just partial deafness, which usually starts with trouble hearing in background noise, but an assortment of poorly-understood auditory abnormalities. These include tinnitus, or ringing in the ear, and hyperacusis, a sensitivity or intolerance to sound, sometimes with ear pain.
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bioarchiv statistics

March 4, 2017

#bioRxiv: a progress report http://ASAPbio.org/biorxiv Great stats on the archive’s 1st years: 134 days from deposit until journal publication

QT:{{”

“The median interval is 134 days. Authors choose to post preprints at a variety of times in the publication cycle of a manuscript, ranging from first draft to simultaneous submission of a completed paper at bioRxiv and a journal. bioRxiv declines papers that have been published or already assigned a journal DOI.”
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