Posts Tagged ‘scinews’

New algorithm can create movies from just a few snippets of text | Science | AAAS

March 18, 2018

Interesting paper by alumnus Renqiang Min on “Video Generation from Text,” using a generative #MachineLearning model. (Press report by @SilverJacket: New algorithm can create movies from just a few snippets of text )

Video Generation from Text Yitong Li†∗, Martin Renqiang Min‡ , Dinghan Shen† , David Carlson† , Lawrence Carin† †

Revolutionary Quantum Computer is One Step Closer to Reality | Newsweek

March 10, 2018

New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of Deep Learning

February 12, 2018

New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of Deep Learning

sharing your genome on a blockchain

February 11, 2018

What to expect in 2018: science in the new year

January 13, 2018

What to expect in ’18: science in the new year Insights from cancer & ancient #genomes. Cures from #CRISPR. Progress in
#OpenAccess. Also, lots on outer space. But nothing on #cryoEM, #DeepLearning, #QuantumComputing or the brain connectome. HT @OBahcall

The future of DNA sequencing

November 14, 2017

The Future of DNA Seq. Apps v Tech. QT: “Platforms for…#sequencing have changed dramatically…Yet the trajectories of other technologies…Internet, digital
photography…suggest…real disrupters will be the resulting applications, not the new tech”

Killer applications –
Over the years, the platforms for DNA sequencing have changed dramatically (see ”). Yet the trajectories of other technologies for which there is a seemingly insatiable demand — smartphones, the Internet, digital photography — suggest that the real disrupters will be the resulting applications, not the new technologies.


Wikipedia shapes language in scientific papers

October 27, 2017

"Wikipedia is one of the world’s most popular websites, but scientists rarely cite it in their papers. Despite this, the online encyclopedia seems to be shaping the language that researchers use in papers, according to an experiment showing that words and phrases in recently published Wikipedia articles subsequently appeared more frequently in scientific papers"

“Thompson and co-author Douglas Hanley, an economist at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, commissioned PhD students to write 43 chemistry articles on topics that weren’t yet on Wikipedia. In January 2015, they published a randomized set of half of the articles to the site. The other half, which served as control articles, weren’t uploaded.

Using text-mining techniques to measure the frequency of words, they found that the language in the scientific papers drifted over the study period as new terms were introduced into the field. This natural drift equated to roughly one new term for every 250 words, Thompson told Nature. On top of those natural changes in language over time, the authors found that, on average, another 1 in every 300 words in a scientific paper was influenced by language in the Wikipedia article.”


#Wikipedia shapes lang. in science Seeding it with new pages & watching them evolve (v ctrls) as a type of soc. expt

Cryo-electron microscopy wins chemistry Nobel : Nature News & Comment

October 5, 2017

Cryo-EM wins chem Nobel Key techdev work in ’80s on flash freezing + atomic res. imaging of xtal & unordered samples

Big names in statistics want to shake up much-maligned P value

August 8, 2017

Big names in #statistics want to shake up…#Pvalue Stronger significance cutoffs (.005?) but danger of FNs

“Lowering P-value thresholds may also exacerbate the “file-drawer problem”, in which studies with negative results are left unpublished, says Tom Johnstone, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Reading, UK. But Benjamin says all research should be published, regardless of P value.

Other scientific fields have already cracked down on P values — and in 2015, one psychology journal banned them. Particle physicists, who collect reams of data from atom-smashing experiments, have long demanded a P value below 0.0000003 (or 3 × 10−7) because of concerns that a lower threshold could lead to mistaken claims, notes Valen Johnson, a statistician at Texas A&M University in College Station and a co-lead author of the paper. More than a decade ago, geneticists took similar steps to establish a threshold of 5 × 10−8 for
genome-wide association studies, which look for differences between people with a disease and those without across hundreds of thousands of DNA-letter variants.”

The Genomics Landscape: A monthly update from the NHGRI Director – July 2017

July 9, 2017

.@Genome_Gov Extramural Grant Portfolio
https://www.Genome.Gov/27569006/july-6-2017-the-nhgri-extramural-grant-portfolio-using-different-approaches-to-fund-genomics-research Nice grid divides programs into PI-initiated/consortia & RFA-solicited v not