Posts Tagged ‘emeperor0mg’

Susan Sontag – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_Sontag

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Sontag died in New York City on 28 December 2004, aged 71, from complications of myelodysplastic syndrome which had evolved into acute myelogenous leukemia.
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Reduced breast cancer mortality after 20+ years of follow-up in the Swedish randomized controlled mammography tr ials in Malmö, Stockholm, and Göteb… – PubMed – NCBI

September 11, 2016

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27306511

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The overview showed a 15% significant relative reduction in breast cancer mortality due to invitation to mammography screening. Heterogeneity in age, trial time, attendance rates, and length of screening intervals may have contributed to the variation in effect between the trials.
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benefit accruing to older women only

Philip Strax – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Strax

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Philip Strax (January 1, 1909 – March 9, 1999) was a radiologist who pioneered the use ofmammography to screen for early breast cancer. With co-investigators statistician Sam Shapiro and surgeon Louis Venet he conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing outcomes of 60,000 women who received either mammogram and clinical breast exam (study group) or "usual practices in receiving medical care" (control group).
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Albert Salomon (surgeon) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Salomon_(surgeon)

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The Papanicolaou test (abbreviated as Pap test, known earlier as Pap smear, cervical smear, or smear test) is a method of cervical screening used to detect potentially pre-cancerous and cancerous processes in the cervix (opening of the uterus or womb).
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Pap test – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pap_test

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The Papanicolaou test (abbreviated as Pap test, known earlier as Pap smear, cervical smear, or smear test) is a method of cervical screening used to detect potentially pre-cancerous and cancerous processes in the cervix (opening of the uterus or womb).
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Barry Marshall – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Marshall

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Barry James Marshall, AC,[1] FRACP, FRS,[3] FAA (born 30 September 1951) is an Australian physician, Nobel Prize laureate in Physiology or Medicine, and Professor of Clinical Microbiology at the University of Western Australia. Marshall and Robin Warrenshowed that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the cause of most peptic ulcers, reversing decades of medical doctrine holding that ulcers were caused by stress, spicy foods, and too much acid. This discovery has allowed for a breakthrough in understanding a causative link between Helicobacter pylori infection and stomach cancer.
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Hepatitis B And Hepatocellular Carcinoma

September 11, 2016

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3047495/

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Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus has been linked epidemiologically to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma for more than 30 years.
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Ames test – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ames_test

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The Ames test is a widely employed method that uses bacteria to test whether a given chemical can cause mutations in the DNA of the test organism. More formally, it is a biological assay to assess the mutagenic potential of chemical compounds.
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Evarts Ambrose Graham – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evarts_Ambrose_Graham

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Graham himself had been a long-term cigarette smoker until his own research supported a link between smoking and disease, and he ironically died from lung cancer in 1957.
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Koch’s postulates – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

September 11, 2016

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koch’s_postulates
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Koch’s postulates are the following:

  1. The microorganism must be found in abundance in all organisms suffering from the disease, but should not be found in healthy organisms.
  2. The microorganism must be isolated from a diseased organism and grown in pure culture.
  3. The cultured microorganism should cause disease when introduced into a healthy organism.
  4. The microorganism must be reisolated from the inoculated, diseased experimental host and identified as being identical to the original specific causative agent.

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