Posts Tagged ‘npc’

Why deep-learning AIs are so easy to fool

February 9, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03013-5

How evolution builds genes from scratch

February 9, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-03061-x

Two-thirds of researchers report ‘pressure to cite’ in Nature poll

February 2, 2020

New term: “Coercive citation”

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02922-9

Human placenta has no microbiome but can contain potential pathogens | Nature

January 26, 2020

require 2 sources of evidence for each microbe & find none!

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1451-5

No bacteria found in healthy placentas

January 26, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02262-8

Use ancient remains more wisely

January 25, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02516-5
A cost of sequencing!

The plan to mine the world’s research papers

January 18, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-02142-1

Move over, DNA: ancient proteins are starting to reveal humanity’s history

January 11, 2020

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01986-x

How to stop data centres from gobbling up the world’s electricity

September 29, 2019

QT:{{”

“The savings made by hyperscale centres can be seen in their power usage efficiency (PUE), defined as the total energy needed for everything, including lights and cooling, divided by the energy used for computing (a PUE of 1.0 would be a perfect score). Conventional data centres typically have a PUE of about 2.0; for hyperscale facilities, that’s been whittled down to about 1.2. Google, for one, boasts a PUE of 1.12 on average for all its centres.

Older or less technologically adept data centres can contain a mix of equipment that is hard to optimize — and some that is even useless. In 2017, Jonathan Koomey, a California-based consultant and leading international expert on IT, surveyed with a colleague more than 16,000 servers tucked into corporate closets and basements and found that about one-quarter of them were “zombies”, sucking up power without doing any useful work — perhaps because someone simply forgot to turn them off. “These are servers sitting around doing nothing except using electricity, and that’s outrageous,” says Koomey.”
“}}

http://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06610-y

A single-cell molecular map of mouse gastrulation and early organogenesis | Nature

February 28, 2019

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-0933-9