Posts Tagged ‘trees’

Camperdown Weeping Elm

September 10, 2018

https://www.bowerandbranch.com/t/215/camperdown-weeping-elm/#.W5bz1hYpCEc

Camperdown Weeping Elm

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Camperdown Weeping Elm is a tree that the whole family will enjoy. Adults will love this unusual ornamental tree’s majestic cascading form and the touch of elegance it lends to the landscape. The little ones, on the other hand, will be excited to discover the “fort” that will appear under the canopy if you let its gracefully arching branches sweep the ground. Even after the kids are grown, they’ll have a soft spot in their hearts for this tree because of the good times they had playing beneath its branches. Maybe one day they’ll bring the grandkids over to play under it, too!
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In Rural Oasis, Serpico Finds New Adversaries – NYTimes.com

July 14, 2017

In Rural Oasis, #Serpico Finds New Adversaries
http://www.NYTimes.com/2013/07/05/nyregion/for-serpico-who-fought-police-corruption-a-new-conflict-over-woodland.html Famous cop from the past protecting #trees from a McMansion developer

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“But now Mr. Serpico’s serenity has been broken and he finds himself battling a new nemesis. This time, it is not an entire agency, but a local developer and town officials who Mr. Serpico says have ignored his complaints; this time, it is not over issues like taking cash payments from drug dealers, but over the fate of some trees and the desecration of pristine woodland.

“It’s like fighting the system again,” Mr. Serpico said. “Here I’m trying to enjoy my tranquillity and I’m being dragged back into a world of corruption.”
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What Is a Tree Worth? – The New Yorker

September 15, 2015

What Is a #Tree Worth?
http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/what-is-a-tree-worth Study on Toronto shows 10 more trees/block =+1% in wellness =$10k/person =being 7yrs younger

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“That is the riddle that underlies a new study in the journal Scientific Reports by a team of researchers in the United States, Canada, and Australia, led by the University of Chicago psychology professor Marc Berman. The study compares two large data sets from the city of Toronto, both gathered on a block-by-block level; the first measures the distribution of green space, as determined from satellite imagery and a comprehensive list of all five hundred and thirty thousand trees planted on public land, and the second measures health, as assessed by a detailed survey of ninety-four thousand respondents. After controlling for income, education, and age, Berman and his colleagues showed that an additional ten trees on a given block corresponded to a one-per-cent increase in how healthy nearby residents felt. “To get an equivalent increase with money, you’d have to give each household in that neighborhood ten thousand dollars—or make people seven years younger,” Berman told me.

You can produce an attenuated version of the same effect simply by looking out a window, or (for experimental convenience) at a picture of a nature scene. Over the past few years, Berman and his colleagues have zeroed in on the “low-level” visual characteristics that distinguish natural from built environments. To do this, they broke down images into their visual components: the proportion of straight to curved edges, the hue and saturation of the colors, the entropy (a statistical measure of randomness in pixel intensity), and so on. The view of an arboretum, for instance, tends to have higher color saturation than that of a street corner, indicating that “the colors in nature are more of the ‘purer’ version of those colors,” Berman said. Even when images are scrambled so that there are no recognizable features, like trees or skyscrapers, to betray what they represent, their low-level visual characteristics still predict how much people will like them.”
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