Posts Tagged ‘wikipedia’

Apple Lisa – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 28, 2014

QT:{{”

While the documentation shipped with the original Lisa only ever referred to it as The Lisa, officially, Apple stated the name was an acronym for Local IntegratedSystem Architecture or “LISA”.[6] Since Steve Jobs’ first daughter (born in 1978) was named Lisa Nicole Brennan, it was normally inferred that the name also had a personal association, and perhaps that the acronym was invented later to fit the name. Andy Hertzfeld[7] states the acronym was reverse engineered from the name “Lisa” in autumn 1982 by the Apple marketing team, after they had hired a marketing consultancy firm to come up with names to replace “Lisa” and “Macintosh” (at the time considered by Jef Raskin to be merely internal project codenames) and then rejected all of the suggestions. Privately, Hertzfeld and the other software developers used “Lisa: Invented Stupid Acronym”, a recursive backronym, while computer industry pundits coined the term “Let’s Invent Some Acronym” to fit the Lisa’s name. Decades later, Jobs would tell his biographer Walter Isaacson: “Obviously it was named for my daughter.”[8] “}}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Lisa

Lawrence Roberts (scientist) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 22, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Roberts_%28scientist%29

J. C. R. Licklider – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

December 22, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._C._R._Licklider

a father of the internet

Intelligence amplification – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

October 12, 2014

IA v AI
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_amplification

Wikipedia:Redirect – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

August 9, 2014

QT:{{”

To create a basic redirect manually, set #REDIRECT [[target page name here]] as the only body text of the page. For instance, if you were redirecting from “UK” to “United Kingdom”, this would be the entire body of the “UK” page:

#REDIRECT [[United Kingdom]]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Redirect

PAX6 – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

June 22, 2014

eyeless in the fly controlling eye dev.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAX6

Hans Spemann – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

June 22, 2014

QT:{{”

Induction and organizers[edit]

Spemann was appointed Professor of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy at Rostock in 1908 and, in 1914, Associate Director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Biology at Dahlem, Berlin. Here he undertook the experiments that would make him famous. Drawing upon the recent work of Warren H. Lewis[2] and Ethel Browne Harvey,[5] he turned his skills to the gastrula, grafting a “field” of cells (the Primitive knot) from one embryo onto another.

The experiments, aided by Hilde Proescholdt (later Mangold), a Ph.D. candidate in Spemann’s laboratory in Freiburg, took place over several years and were published in full only in 1924. They described an area in the embryo, the portions of which, upon transplantation into a second embryo, organized or “induced” secondary embryonic primordia regardless of location. Spemann called these areas “organiser centres” or “organisers”. Later he showed that different parts of the organiser centre produce different parts of the embryo.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Spemann

Karl Ernst von Baer – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

June 22, 2014

QT:{{”

von Baer studied the embryonic development of animals, discovering the blastula stage of development and the notochord. Together with Heinz Christian Pander and based on the work by Caspar Friedrich Wolff he described the germ layer theory of development (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) as a principle in a variety of species, laying the foundation for comparative embryology in the book Über
Entwickelungsgeschichte der Thiere (1828). In 1826 Baer discovered the mammalianovum. The first human ovum was described by Edgar Allen in 1928. In 1827 he completed research Ovi Mammalium et Hominis genesi for Saint-Petersburg’s Academy of Science (published at Leipzig[7][8]) and established that mammals develop from eggs.

He formulated what became known as Baer’s laws of embryology:

General characteristics of the group to which an embryo belongs develop before special characteristics.
General structural relations are likewise formed before the most specific appear.
The form of any given embryo does not converge upon other definite forms, but separates itself from them.
The embryo of a higher animal form never resembles the adult of another animal form, such as one less evolved, but only its embryo.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Ernst_von_Baer

Zone of polarizing activity – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

June 22, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zone_of_polarizing_activity

Tiktaalik – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

June 21, 2014

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiktaalik